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Watch: how to tackle the gender pay gap

Many employers want to make real improvements  to gender equality and diversity, but choosing which actions to implement can be challenging. There’s a gap between established practice and evidence. For example, employers could be forgiven for thinking that adding one woman to a shortlist is an effective way to hire more women into senior positions […]

June 15, 2018


The illusion of similarity

This is the sixth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. The “illusion of similarity” is where policy makers have inaccurate assumptions about what people think or know, and inaccurate predictions about how people will act. This can cause policy makers to think […]

June 14, 2018


BX2018: Helping people save on their energy

This blog post is the third in a series that we are writing in the lead up to the 2018 Behavioural Exchange in Sydney. It outlines our recent work in energy markets, which is the focus of one of the breakout sessions. As energy has been an area that we’ve worked in for a while, […]

June 11, 2018


The problem with groups

This is the fifth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Thomas Hobbes, in one of the first modern treatises on government, recognised that, in groups, advisers are ‘not moved by their own sense, but by the eloquence of another, or for […]

June 8, 2018


Call for papers about Social Norms

Of all the interventions that have come to the fore since the behavioural revolution in government, perhaps the most prominent has been the use of social norms to encourage behaviours. Whether it’s encouraging people to pay their taxes on time, getting doctors to reduce their antibiotic prescriptions or boosting classroom attendance, these norms are now […]

June 8, 2018


What should government pay attention to?

This is the fourth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. You might say – whatever the public cares about. The fact that people care about an issue is of course important in a democracy – no politician will last long if […]

June 1, 2018


80% of success in life? Showing up

As the saying goes, 80% of success is showing up*. And the same is true in public services. Every day, millions of people across the globe don’t show up for hospital appointments, school, job fairs, and so on. It might be as little as a few minutes or hours out of someone’s day, but these […]

May 30, 2018


BX2018: Taking a behavioural approach to stopping crime

The second of our series of articles in the lead up to the 2018 Behavioural Exchange in Sydney outlines our recent work on crime and domestic violence, in the UK and Australia. This area will be the focus of one of the breakout sessions. Director of Home Affairs and International Programmes, Simon Ruda, joins Karen Tindall, […]

May 30, 2018


How confirmation bias stops us solving problems

This is the third blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Confirmation bias is the tendency to seek out, interpret, judge and remember information so that it supports one’s pre-existing views and ideas. Confirmation bias can make people less likely to engage […]

May 25, 2018


BX2018: Diverse approaches to improving gender diversity

This is the first in a series of blog posts in the lead up to the Behavioural Exchange 2018 conference in Sydney. It continues the ongoing conversation that we, as a global organisation, have been having about diversity, and the role Behavioural Insights can play in improving gender equality. To talk about our recent work […]

May 21, 2018